older couple embracing and smiling

Sexual well-being is an important part of any person’s life, and when things aren’t going well or working right, it can be embarrassing and difficult to talk about with your sexual partner and your doctor. But it doesn’t have to be, and your life does not have to be dictated by sexual dysfunction. Below are a few common problems you or your partner might be experiencing. Read on to learn what to do to make an appointment with one of our sexual medicine specialists!

LOW TESTOSTERONE

It is true that a man’s sex drive decreases as he ages due to a natural decline in testosterone over the course of his life. But, sometimes testosterone production slows down too fast, resulting in low testosterone, or Low T. Low T can be connected to Erectile Dysfunction (ED), but it is not always the cause of ED. Low T is also connected to heart disease, obesity, diabetes, and depression. If you are experiencing a reduced sex-drive as well as weight gain, depression, and irritability and brain fog, you might have Low T. Fortunately, our team of specialists are on the cutting edge of testosterone replacement therapy and we’ve got you covered.

ERECTILE DYSFUNCTION

Erectile Dysfunction (ED) is difficulty getting or maintaining an erection firm enough to have sex, and it has many causes. It can be caused by problems with blood flow due to heart problems, high blood pressure, or heavy smoking or alcohol use, all of which can contribute to damage to the blood vessels that create the blood flow into the penis, resulting in an erection. It can also be caused by nerve supply or hormone levels (see Low Testosterone above). Sometimes it is psychological, or it’s caused by interference from prescription drugs. Because Erectile Dysfunction can be caused by so many things, you’ll want to talk to our specialists about what might be causing it in your case. Dr. Rubin at IntimMedicine Specialists is a urologist with fellowship training in Sexual Medicine and performs extensive testing unique to each patient’s individual needs. Fortunately, ED is treatable! From behavioral changes to medications, hormone replacement therapy (HRT) to penile implants, there is a solution out there for you.

STRESS OR DEPRESSION

Low sex drive or erectile dysfunction are often linked to stress and depression, either resulting from it or causing it. Talk to us about what’s going on in your life. Our holistic approach includes treating each patient as a whole person, with every aspect of their lives in mind. If stress or depression is a symptom of sexual dysfunction or is causing it, we are here to listen and to help you get relief from it.

None of these symptoms or sexual problems should rule your life. Often, men report depression and relationship problems that stem from sexual dysfunction. Don’t let these problems keep you from enjoying your life! The good news is that our very own urology specialist Dr. Rachel Rubin is on the cutting edge of today’s urology procedures and practices, and she is ready to listen and help create a treatment plan specifically for you – call 202.293.1000 to make an appointment with Dr. Rubin in the Washington, DC area to get your confidence and your life back today!

fda approved addyi todayDear Patient, Supporters and Friends,

Today the FDA made #HERstory for women with the approval of a first-ever medical treatment option for women’s most common sexual dysfunction, known as Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder, or HSDD. You can think of this disorder (HSDD) as: distressing low desire that can affect a woman, her partner or both and that lasts and lasts and lasts for more than 6 months regardless of circumstances, mood, vacation, health, etc. After enjoying normal sexual function, and then totally losing one’s interest in or desire for sex for longer than 6 months gives you some idea of the scope and impact of HSDD.

I know all of you have been closely monitoring the national conversation over the “little pink pill” or the “female Viagra” during the last year as the drumbeat has built among organizations such as ours – and among hundreds of thousands of people across the country – for treatment options for a condition that the FDA itself has recognized as a key unmet medical need. We at James A. Simon, MD, PC have been actively involved in the development of Flibanserin, or its new trade name ADDYI, for many years and have conducted several of the clinical trials used for FDA approval right here in the Washington, DC, office. For those of you who participated in those clinical studies, we want to personally thank you. Whether you received the active treatment in those trials or the matching placebo, soon you will be able to take “the real thing.”

James A. Simon, MD, PC is proud to be a part of such a thrilling moment in women’s sexual health and for the 16 million American women currently living without a single FDA-approved medical treatment option for HSDD.

With the FDA’s action today, The Agency not only approved a first-ever medical treatment option for HSDD, it also demonstrated that there IS a viable regulatory pathway forward toward approval of additional therapies for this and other female sexual health indications. Further, Flibanserin’s (ADDYI’s) approval today, opens the pipeline for other future options yet to come for women’s sexual health. In that vein, we are currently conducting additional studies on other medications for female sexual dysfunction right here at James A. Simon, MD, PC, and we are always looking for qualified study subjects/volunteers.

Women with HSDD deserve the safety and peace of mind that comes with access to FDA-approved medical treatment options, and today we write a new chapter in the fight for equity in sexual health.

Sincerely,
The entire James A. Simon, MD, PC family

 

Interested in women’s sexual health? Contact us for an appointment.

Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder (HSDD) is described as having the following characteristics:

  • persistently or recurrently deficient (or absent) sexual fantasies and desire for sexual activitypillows-820149_640
  • marked distress or interpersonal difficulty in response to this deficiency
  • lack of another explanation known to affect sexual function.

In other words, a person once had a healthy desire for sex which they have lost, and there is no other explanation for that loss of interest or desire. In addition, the loss of this desire is noted by the person and the change is causing distress, relationship difficulty or both. (Source: Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition)

In clinical practice, HSDD is easily identified using the Decreased Sexual Desire Screener (DSDS), a simple screening test that asks 4 yes/no questions:

  1. In the past, was your level of sexual desire or interest good and satisfying to you?
  2.  Has there been a decrease in your level of sexual desire or interest?
  3.  Are you bothered by your decreased level of sexual desire or interest?
  4. Would you like your level of sexual desire or interest to increase?

A “yes” response to each of these questions is required. In addition, a fifth question asks whether a number of conditions, drugs, or circumstances might be responsible for the decreased desire or interest:

  • an operation, depression, injuries, or other medical condition
  • medications, drugs, or alcohol you are currently taking
  • pregnancy, recent childbirth, or menopausal symptoms
  • other sexual issues you may be having (pain, decreased arousal or orgasm)
  • your partner’s sexual problems
  • dissatisfaction with your relationship or partner
  • stress or fatigue.

Only when all of these items are excluded as possibilities can a diagnosis of HSDD be made. (Source: OBG Management, July 2015, sidebar)

 

Interested in women’s sexual health? Contact us for an appointment.

Recent Posts

Categories

Archives