Pellet Hormone Replacement FAQ

We know that Hormone Replacement Therapy is essential for managing severe menopause (or “manopause!”) symptoms, and hopefully there is an easy way to deliver it, right? Fortunately, there is! IntimMedicine offers an easy outpatient procedure to place a bioidentical hormone pellet under the skin. Outta sight, outta mind, and you get to start living your life again!

What is it?

Pellets are compounded bioidentical hormones for women (our team of experts will determine exactly what’s right for you – the right amount can help you regain your hormonal balance). Pellet therapy is actually FDA approved for men, as well. Pellets are typically naturally occurring hormones that are pressed into a solid, little insert, about the size of a grain of rice.

How does it work?

Your pellet will release a small amount of your hormonal regimen straight into your bloodstream, similar to what your ovaries or testes would normally have produced in your younger years. Research shows that pellets are able to deliver a consistent level of hormones to your body, unlike some creams, gels, or pills which are also compounded. Pellets also reduce the risk of blood clots (venous thrombosis) associated with oral hormone replacement therapy because the hormones released from pellets enter the bloodstream directly and do not cause changes in blood clotting factors made in the liver the way oral medications can. It’s a win-win!

How is it used?

Hormone Replacement Pellets are used like any other Hormone Replacement Therapy to help our bodies regain some of its hormonal balance, which will improve everything from the emotional roller coaster to hot flashes. The pellet is just a convenient delivery method! It’s not for everyone, but getting your hormones “just right” no matter the method is critical.

How long does the procedure take?

It is a quick and painless (with numbing medication) outpatient office procedure. We will insert the HRT pellet right into your hip, abdomen or buttock area, and you’ll be on your way and back to your life!

How long till I see results?

It will only take 7-10 days for you to notice your HRT Pellet working on your symptoms.

How long will my pellet last?

HRT Pellets typically last 3-6 months for men and women.

How can I make an appointment? Call us at 202.293.1000 or email us to set up a consultation appointment with one of our specialists here in Washington, DC. Don’t wait to get back to living your normal life – call us today!

man pretending to eat the sun
Daily Dose of Vitamin D

Maybe you’ve heard of taking Vitamin D supplements to help slow down bone loss, but what about taking it to improve your sexual function and satisfaction?

According to a recently published study which took place in Italy over the last 15 years, Vitamin D deficiency might play a part in erectile dysfunction and other sexual dysfunctions in men. Each of the 114 participants were assessed for five aspects of male sexual life, including erectile and orgasmic function, sexual desire, intercourse satisfaction, and overall satisfaction, and over the course of the study, researchers found that higher levels of Vitamin D was associated with higher scores for all five of those aspects.

Some of the participants of the study were given Vitamin D supplements over the course of their treatment for sexual dysfunction. “Vitamin D levels are directly able to influence all sexual function parameters,” the authors of the study wrote. “Evaluation of our study clearly shows the improvement of erectile function after vitamin D replacement therapy.”

Vitamin D is also a necessary nutrient for both men and women’s health, and Vitamin D deficiency has been linked to various cancers, cognitive impairment in older adults, depression and tiredness, and an increased risk of heart disease, so it’s worth making sure you’re getting a sufficient amount of Vitamin D even if you are satisfied with your sexual function. It can be difficult to know that you’re getting the right amount of Vitamin D just from exposure to the sun, and particularly during the Winter it can be tough to get enough sunlight. Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is linked to a lack of Vitamin D during the winter months and rainy seasons, and results in depression. All of this can be treated with a daily Vitamin D supplement.

As we go through the Winter season, think about how much Vitamin D you’re getting from natural sunlight and if you might benefit from more time spent outside or from a supplement. You can always call us at 202.293.1000 to make an appointment at our office in Washington, DC, if you have questions about how a lack of Vitamin D might be affecting your sexual function.

Dr. Rachel Rubin
Dr. Rachel Rubin

Until recently, I never knew sexual medicine was its own specialty. I mean, of course there has to be a field of sexual medicine, since there are medical fields for every other aspect of biological human life, but when I first heard about IntimMedicine Specialists, I had lots of questions. What does a sexual medicine specialist do? What can they offer that a general physician can’t? What could I expect at an appointment, and what would I make an appointment for?

I got to sit down with Dr. Rachel Rubin, an expert in sexual medicine and urologist on staff at IntimMedicine, and ask her some of these questions. She put me at ease right away, asking me about myself with genuine interest before we got to the questions I had for her. I hope you’ll find her answers as enlightening as I did!

Dr. Rubin trained as a urologist at Georgetown University Hospital. Early on she realized that talking about sexual issues was very uncomfortable for patients and even more uncomfortable for the doctors who were trying to train her. “Research has shown that medical professionals don’t do a very good job of bringing sexual issues up with their patients, often because they feel there is a lack of time and expertise to be able to follow up on the questions they get asked,” she said. Dr. Rubin found that she was not afraid to ask people questions about sexual issues, and her interest in treating sexual dysfunction only grew. She completed a sexual medicine fellowship in San Diego and then joined the team at IntimMedicine.

“Sexual medicine is a relatively unknown field made up of many different types of providers who believe strongly in quality of life and improving the sexual health of their patients and their partners,” said Dr. Rubin. “We see people with erectile dysfunction, low libido, penile curvature, pelvic pain, urinary incontinence, and hormone issues, among other things.”

Many times, Dr. Rubin said, patients and their doctors are not only uncomfortable discussing sexual health—they also don’t have time in a 15-minute visit to address such intimate issues. “We don’t see 50 patients a day. We spend a lot of time with our patients, and I pride myself on being able to work within the medical community to build a multidisciplinary team to help each individual patient and couple. Sometimes there needs to be medical treatments or surgeries, and sometimes we need specialized physical therapists to be involved. We often team up with mental health professionals as well, because no one ever taught us how to talk about sex and getting a ‘coach’ to help with that is extremely important. Sexual medicine is very much a ‘team sport’ in terms of figuring out which team members need to be involved with each individual case – it’s not a one-size-fits-all model.”

Another member of that team? The patient’s partner. Dr. Rubin encourages patients who feel comfortable doing so to bring their partners to appointments.

“It is not uncommon that I see a patient and then their significant other comes to see me later, realizing it ‘takes two to tango,’” she said. “Oftentimes you have to think of each patient in the context of a couple, and it’s important to help both people.”

Maybe you have something that is bothering you about your sexual health, but you’ve got too much else going on or you’d rather not think about it, and definitely not talk about it. I asked Dr. Rubin what she would say to people who keep putting off seeing a sexual medicine specialist. “Quality of life is incredibly important,” she said. “Focusing on yourself and your health as a couple is valuable.” Dr. Rubin went on to emphasize that sexual health is closely connected to general health. She also added that “focusing on your sexual health may actually benefit many other parts of your life.” For example, “Erectile dysfunction can be a sign of early cardiovascular disease.”

“Before I see a new patient, I always have a screening phone call with them first, just to make sure it’s a good fit for them before they make an appointment,” Dr. Rubin told me when I asked her what people could expect from an appointment with her. “When people come into my office, they sit across from me, fully clothed, and we just have a conversation. I spend a lot of time showing them anatomical diagrams and explaining everything we’re going to do before we ever do an exam or procedure. Nothing invasive ever happens without a full discussion and without the opportunity for lots of questions to be asked.”

Dr. Rubin’s tone became both more impassioned and gentler when I asked her to name one thing she wished people understood about sexual dysfunction. It was clear to me that she cared deeply about this when she answered. “People are often afraid to admit that they have a problem, because they’re so afraid that it means there is something different or abnormal about them. I understand that it can provoke a lot of anxiety to just come out and say ‘I have a problem, and it’s sexual,’ even to a doctor. Nobody taught any of us how to talk about sex to our partners, or to our doctors, so it can feel very isolating, but the truth is all of these issues are so incredibly common. After speaking with me, my patients are very comforted in knowing that they’re not alone and that there is help.”

As we ended our chat, Dr. Rubin said, “This is all we do,” referring to the team at IntimMedicine Specialists. “Our patients have access to all of the expertise we represent and receive very individualized care. We’ll take the time to get to know you and help you focus on your sexual health.”

So now, I have a question for you: why are you waiting to start working on your sexual health?

 

Call 202.293.1000 to make an appointment with IntimMedicine Specialists in Washington, D.C.

Also: follow Dr. Rubin on twitter @rachelsrubin1 and the IntimMedicine team @intimmedicine

older couple embracing and smiling

Sexual well-being is an important part of any person’s life, and when things aren’t going well or working right, it can be embarrassing and difficult to talk about with your sexual partner and your doctor. But it doesn’t have to be, and your life does not have to be dictated by sexual dysfunction. Below are a few common problems you or your partner might be experiencing. Read on to learn what to do to make an appointment with one of our sexual medicine specialists!

LOW TESTOSTERONE

It is true that a man’s sex drive decreases as he ages due to a natural decline in testosterone over the course of his life. But, sometimes testosterone production slows down too fast, resulting in low testosterone, or Low T. Low T can be connected to Erectile Dysfunction (ED), but it is not always the cause of ED. Low T is also connected to heart disease, obesity, diabetes, and depression. If you are experiencing a reduced sex-drive as well as weight gain, depression, and irritability and brain fog, you might have Low T. Fortunately, our team of specialists are on the cutting edge of testosterone replacement therapy and we’ve got you covered.

ERECTILE DYSFUNCTION

Erectile Dysfunction (ED) is difficulty getting or maintaining an erection firm enough to have sex, and it has many causes. It can be caused by problems with blood flow due to heart problems, high blood pressure, or heavy smoking or alcohol use, all of which can contribute to damage to the blood vessels that create the blood flow into the penis, resulting in an erection. It can also be caused by nerve supply or hormone levels (see Low Testosterone above). Sometimes it is psychological, or it’s caused by interference from prescription drugs. Because Erectile Dysfunction can be caused by so many things, you’ll want to talk to our specialists about what might be causing it in your case. Dr. Rubin at IntimMedicine Specialists is a urologist with fellowship training in Sexual Medicine and performs extensive testing unique to each patient’s individual needs. Fortunately, ED is treatable! From behavioral changes to medications, hormone replacement therapy (HRT) to penile implants, there is a solution out there for you.

STRESS OR DEPRESSION

Low sex drive or erectile dysfunction are often linked to stress and depression, either resulting from it or causing it. Talk to us about what’s going on in your life. Our holistic approach includes treating each patient as a whole person, with every aspect of their lives in mind. If stress or depression is a symptom of sexual dysfunction or is causing it, we are here to listen and to help you get relief from it.

None of these symptoms or sexual problems should rule your life. Often, men report depression and relationship problems that stem from sexual dysfunction. Don’t let these problems keep you from enjoying your life! The good news is that our very own urology specialist Dr. Rachel Rubin is on the cutting edge of today’s urology procedures and practices, and she is ready to listen and help create a treatment plan specifically for you – call 202.293.1000 to make an appointment with Dr. Rubin in the Washington, DC area to get your confidence and your life back today!

African American couple smiling with beverages and soft pretzels

If you or a loved one has an enlarged prostate known as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), you are well aware of the negative effects it can have on your life, such as difficult or frequent urination. Maybe you’ve considered surgery, but the risks–including potentially worsening erectile or ejaculatory dysfunction, which you may already be experiencing due to BPH or the medications you’re taking in the first place–kept you from choosing that option.

We know living with BPH, which affects 12 times as many men as prostate cancer, can be a struggle. Men with BPH are more likely to suffer from depression, decreased productivity, a diminished quality of life, and interrupted sleep. Not treating BPH can cause symptoms to worsen and even lead to permanent damage to your bladder. What is one to do with these scary statistics and no good answers?

That’s where we come in! We are excited to share that the American Urological Association (AUA) now recommends on the UroLift® System “as a standard of care treatment for lower urinary tract symptoms due to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH),” and our very own Dr. Rachel Rubin, a urologic surgeon, and sexual medicine specialist, is one of the early adopters of this new treatment option for men with BPH. The UroLift System is a “proven, minimally invasive treatment that fills the gap between prescription medications and more invasive surgical procedures.”

“The Urolift System is one of the few sex-friendly treatment options we have for BPH,” Says Dr. Rubin. “It is shown to improve flow, urinary frequency, and urgency, all while allowing men to maintain their ability to ejaculate normally and not increase the chances of erectile dysfunction.”

The UroLift System consists of a UroLift Delivery Device and small UroLift Implants. The implants widen the urethra within the enlarged prostate, alleviating the irritating symptoms related to BPH. Men who have received UroLift Implants report “rapid and durable symptomatic and urinary flow rate improvement without compromising sexual function,” according to clinical data collected in a study by the manufacturer of UroLift. You can learn more about some of the men UroLift has helped on the company’s website.

So what are you waiting for? Make an appointment with Dr. Rachel Rubin here in Washington, D.C. today to discuss the UroLift System and get relief for BPH now!

As men age, testosterone production from the testes steadily decreases. As a result, many middle-aged men will have blood levels of testosterone that dip below the normal range. The result, low testosterone (sometimes abbreviated as “low T”), is a common condition, but it’s one that’s frequently both underdiagnosed and undertreated and overdiagnosed and overtreated. Just because low T is part of the aging process doesn’t mean that there isn’t anything you can do. In fact, we emphatically believe that keeping your hormone levels in balance is an important part of maintaining your overall health.

 

What Do Reduced Testosterone Levels Look Like?

Low testosterone levels alone may not be enough for men to seek treatment, but it’s certainly worth a visit to the doctor if you start experiencing symptoms like:

  • Reduced sexual interest
  • Decreased quality and frequency of erections
  • Low energy
  • Inordinate fatigue following a normal level of exercise
  • Depression or feelings of sadness
  • Low bone density or osteoporosis

Most of the time, reduced testosterone is simply a side effect of aging. But there are also instances where it’s a symptom of a bigger health condition, like:

  • High blood pressure
  • Elevated cholesterol
  • Diabetes
  • Overweight or obesity

The good news is this: men don’t have to suffer. There are a variety of treatments — from simple weight loss to testosterone therapy — that can help alleviate the symptoms. But it’s important for this low testosterone treatment to come from an experienced professional.

 

What Side Effects Can Occur With Testosterone Replacement Therapy?

What men shouldn’t do is take matters into their own hands and self-medicate, despite the numerous medications that may be readily available through online pharmacies. The side effects of testosterone replacement therapy can be serious — even life-threatening — if not managed by an experienced medical professional.

For example, more than 1,300 men thought that they were safely treating their condition through testosterone supplements like Fortesta and AndroGel. But they found themselves plaintiffs in testosterone lawsuits when their treatments allegedly did far more harm than good, causing medical conditions like deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolisms and strokes.

But failing to follow recommended dosing amounts can result in other serious safety risks, according to the FDA, like damage to the heart, brain, liver and endocrine system — not to mention increased risks for heart attacks and paralysis.

 

When Done Right, Treatment Works

While it seems time-consuming and inconvenient to treat low testosterone under medical supervision, it’s the best way to get you to feeling better while also significantly reducing the risk of medical complications. And when it comes to trusting your health and sexual wellness to a professional, look no further than Dr. Rachel Rubin and her extensive expertise.

Please contact our office at (202) 293-1000 to make an appointment for a thorough examination and to discuss how testosterone replacement therapy may be able to help you.

Upon hearing a cancer diagnosis a person’s world changes immediately and forever. The person becomes a patient. The patient has to make myriad decisions about treatment plans, and the possibility of surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy. These treatments, while life-saving, are also life-altering. The side effects can modify body image, reduce or end fertility, change sexual identity and sexual function. Approximately 60 percent of cancer survivors have long-term sexual dysfunction. Oncology teams (who may focus more on the life-saving aspects of care) aren’t always taking the time to discuss fertility or sexual health matters as much as they should. But the good news is that our practice can help save a women’s eggs, or a man’s sperm for future use; mitigate and reverse most hormonal changes, and starting in September, we will also offer treatment for men with urological or sexual complaints in our practice. Our newest colleague, Rachel S. Rubin, MD, is specially trained to treat hormonal and sexual dysfunction in both men and women.

Talking about sexual health outside of the bedroom, in the office of a compassionate physician is key to holistic wellness. The emotions of being a cancer survivor can be overwhelming in and of themselves, but to add infertility or sexual dysfunction to the list of health issues can be daunting. We’re here to help you get back on track.

For Men
Following prostate cancer treatment, for example, the ability to have and maintain an erection becomes difficult and for some men, impossible, without help from a medical practice such as ours. Many men may not feel comfortable talking about these intimate issues, but there is help. Our compassionate and caring staff can help men who experiene treatable symptoms. It’s not just about physical symptoms, cancer affects sexual identity and when men are unable to perform as they could prior to cancer treatment, it can have a serious and detrimental effect on one’s psyche. Getting the courage to seek help is the first step to getting back to the “new normal.”

For Women
Breast cancer, when surgery is required, may alter a woman’s body and can hinder sexual identity and function. Breasts, once part of the sexual experience for both partners, are no longer the same. Even when reconstructed, the breasts may feel different, lack the pleasurable sensitivity they once had, or might even be painful and distracting. Sensation might even be completely gone. Partners may also feel hindered by the feeling of the new breasts. This can be uncomfortable for both partners. With any cancer treatment (i.e. chemotherapy, surgical removal of the ovaries or even hysterectomy) a patient may find herself in early/premature menopause with hot flashes, night sweats, disturbed sleep and weight gain. This is also accompanied by vaginal dryness, and pain with genital touching or intercourse. There are options to help enhance the sexual experience that we have available at the office, and that are not available anywhere else.

A wonderful Newsweek article about these issues does a deeper dive from both the patient and physician perspective that we welcome you to read for additional information.

If you are just starting cancer treatment, going through it, or are in the post-treatment phase and are facing future or current fertility concerns, hormonal deficiencies, or sexual dysfunction, we can help. Please call our office at (202) 293-1000 to make an appointment with one of our caring and compassionate members of Dr. James A Simon’s team.

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