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Testosterone Therapy

I have been involved in the development of testosterone products for women for many years. My research has been included in the original Princeton Consensus on Testosterone Insufficiency in Women back in 2002, and in the testing of Estratest and Estratest HS for female sexual function (both of which are still on the U.S. market), in the development of the Intrinsa Testosterone Patch for women by Proctor and Gamble, (which was never approved by FDA, but was approved and available for years in Europe), as well as in a testosterone gel for women, Libigel (which also failed to win FDA approval). Some of my additional publications on this topic can be found here

Needless to say, after all of this time, I am grateful to have been part of the International Menopause Society’s global consensus that testosterone treatment for post-menopausal women is viable and useful for female sexual dysfunction. It is time the medical community accepted this so that women can get the help they need and start feeling like themselves again for the second half of their lives.


What are the benefits/risks of testosterone supplementation? 

The primary benefits discussed in the global consensus include increased interest in sex and easier arousal and orgasm, but testosterone also contributes to increased lean muscle mass, increased bone density, and improved energy and sense of well-being. 

There literally are no risks to proper transdermal testosterone therapy if testosterone levels are kept within the normal range. If testosterone exceeds the normal range (and this can easily happen when women use men’s products not approved for use by women) women can sometimes: lose the hair on their heads, develop dark facial hair – even beards – get hairy elsewhere, have their voices change to a lower register, get an enlarged clitoris which can be too sensitive, and possibly increase one’s risk of heart attack or venous blood clots.

When testosterone treatment is taken under a doctor’s supervision and properly monitored, these side effects will typically not occur.

 

What patient population is testosterone treatment indicated for? 

All postmenopausal women may benefit from testosterone treatment, but particularly those with induced menopause (i.e. women who have had their ovaries removed, have had their ovaries radiated [even accidentally] and ovary failure ensued or had chemotherapy and their ovaries failed as a result). 

 

Testosterone and Sex Drive

I recently described a dose-response relationship-specific for testosterone for sex in women and how it is different for testosterone for sex in men. Basically, women can get too much testosterone, and it either does not increase and may actually decrease their interest in sex. As current President of ISSWSH, The International Society for the Study of Women’s Sexual Health we have nearly completed a “how-to” paper on how to use testosterone in women. In the absence of an approved product specifically for women, and the possible negative side effects of inappropriate use at high doses, this publication will be used a practice “bible” for uses of testosterone in menopausal women in the future.

 

If you think you might benefit from testosterone therapy…

Call us and make an appointment at 202.293.1000. We take the time with each of our patients to determine possible causes of complaints and develop a treatment plan that will work for you. Don’t wait to start living your life again, so make that call and let us help you!

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